Life in Mt. Rainier’s Pacific Silver Fir Zone

Mount Rainier’s Pacific Silver Fir Zone, also known as the Montane Zone, is found between 2,900 ft and 4,500 ft.  Our favorite campground, White River campground, can be found here.  It’s a beautiful area, lots of fir and pine trees.

It begins to cool down in this zone.  There aren’t many large animals there for hikers and campers to see.  But here’s a small list of what you will find there.

 

 

 

Black Bears roam across many areas of Mt. Rainier National Park, looking for inexperienced campers to scare… well, ok… they don’t really.  And as I found out a few years ago, just because their fur is brown does not mean they are a grizzly coming to eat you!

They love to visit the Pacific Silver Fir Zone, especially in the late summer and early fall.  Low growing huckleberry bushes flood the area with a nice red color, and draw the bears in for huckleberries.  Remember, leave them alone and they should leave you alone.  Do not give them food!

 

445.jpg northern flying squirrel image by camper-mike

Northern Flying Squirrels float about in the Pacific Silver Fir Zone.  These little guys only come out at night.  They love to eat mushrooms, and they also eat nuts, insects, eggs and other small things.  They like to store up lichens and seeds for when food is less abundant.  Make sure to pack up your food and get rid of your garbage, otherwise you’ll have these midnight bandits raiding your campsite.

Often the flying rodents will share nests with others of their kind.  It helps them to keep warm in the winter.  Usually there’s only a few, but one nest was found to have over 50 of them crowding in!  If you happen to be out in the park at night in May or June you’ll likely see them flying about looking for mates.  Take one of these to help you find them in the dark.

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There are lots of other animals in the park, and even in the Pacific Silver Fir Zone.  Remember to leave nature as it is, don’t try to feed the wild animals and don’t get too close to them.  It’s dangerous for them and for you!

If you’re planning a trip to Mt. Rainier National Park, you’ll want to check out some of the good deals from Whittaker Mountaineering at http://www.whittakermountaineering.com/pg/on_sale  These guys know a lot about the park and about climbing Mt. Rainier.  They can guide you to the best products to have for where you’ll be on the mountain, and for what you’ll be doing there.

Remember that as the snow starts to melt, the waterfalls swell with water and beauty.  Go check them out in a couple months, and be careful that you don’t get swept away.

Praise God for this wonderland in the Pacific Northwest!!!  He is so good to us!

 

 

 

 

Critters of Mt. Rainier’s Lowland Forest Zone

God has placed inside the Pacific Northwest a vibrant and beautiful region, known to us as Mount Rainier.  The variety of “life zones” on Mount Rainier creates an environment in which many types of wildlife can live.  The first life zone that one encounters when entering the park is the “Lowland Forest Zone.”  The dense forest shades most of Ohanapecosh, Longmire & Carbon River from sunlight.   A number of animals prefer this environment.

American Beaver.jpg

Beavers love the Lowland Forest Zone of Mt. Rainier.  The waters flow at a slower pace here, making for a gentler place to build their dams and lodges.  These constructs can be made of the softer spruce, fir, cedar or hemlock; though the beavers prefer the harder willows, alders and maples.  The like to eat the inner bark on the harder trees, as well as various roots, water plants and pond algae.

Tamiasciurus douglasii (Oregon coast)

Douglas Squirrels can also be found in the park’s Lowland Forest Zone.  You can tell they’re about when you hear their alarm call… chickareeeee!  These squirrels mostly eat seeds from coniferous trees, but they also like acorns, berries, mushrooms, fruit and even the occasional bird egg.  Unlike most tree squirrels, Douglas Squirrels do not have a cheek pouches to carry their food in.  Wandering through Mount Rainier’s Lowland Forest Zone, one might happen across a pile of pine cone scales.  Douglas Squirrels will use the same pile for years, sometimes over multiple generations.

 

Bald Eagles and Peregrine Falcons are attracted to the Lowland Forest Zone of Mount Rainier.  Critters like the ones listed above serve as tasty meals for these birds of prey.  Though these birds are often seen there, Mount Rainier’s website states that there are no reports of the birds nesting in the park.  Apparently they like to dine and dash.

The Northern Spotted Owl is another bird of prey that is attracted to Mount Rainier National Park.  They are the only bird species on the USFWS list of threatened & endangered species that call the park home.   These owls like to swallow their prey whole, and vomit up the indigestible parts in pellet form.  Don’t count on seeing much of these owls during the day, as they are mostly nocturnal.

Many other species of animals can be found in the Lowland Forest Zone of Mount Rainier.  For more information on these animals, check out ” A Pocket Field Guide to the Plants and Animals of Mount Rainier,” available at Whittaker Mountaineering‘s online store.