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It’s the 3rd week of the month again, which means it’s time for the CSFF Blog tour reviews.  The book for March is “The Resurrection”, by Mike Duran.

So due to many events, including a road trip to Reno for a wedding and having guests from out of state, not to mention a lot of  lost sleep (which I am now mentioning) I was not able to finish the book in time for a full review.  I also missed out on an opportunity to get a review copy of next month’s book, so I will probably not be participating in the April tour.

However, I did read the 1st 1/3rd of March’s “The Resurrection”. 

The beginning of the book was hard for me to get past, mostly because I thought the book would just be furthering the false idea that the miraculous gifts, those given to the apostles & to the people they passed them on to, have not yet passed into a thing of history.  However I know that one does not have to believe that doctrine in order to write a fiction novel utilizing these gifts, so I read on.

As I read on I found that the book was slowly drawing me in.  More and more mysterious elements are slowly added, and they gave me reason to try to guess what was coming next.  The more I wonder, the further I’m being drawn into the book.

About 1/3 of the way into the book there seems to be a shift in the pace of the plot starting up.  It appears like there is going to be more action happening, a few more mysteries, and some of the answers are finally beginning to be revealed.  There are, however, plenty of questions to be answered.

I’m looking forward to finishing the book.  However, considering some of the elements so far, I don’t know yet who I would or would not recommend the book to.

To get more information about the book visit one of these book/author sites, or check out some reviews from other members of the blog tour:

*Book link – http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/161638204X

Author’s web site – http://mikeduran.com/

Blog tour participants:

Noah Arsenault
Brandon Barr
Red Bissell
Book Reviews By Molly
Keanan Brand
Kathy Brasby
Grace Bridges
Beckie Burnham
Melissa Carswell
Jeff Chapman
Christian Fiction Book Reviews
Carol Bruce Collett
Valerie Comer
Karri Compton
Wanda Costinak
Amy Cruson
CSFF Blog Tour
Janey DeMeo
Cynthia Dyer
Tori Greene
Nikole Hahn
Katie Hart
Joleen Howell
Bruce Hennigan
Becky Jesse
Cris Jesse
Jason Joyner
Carol Keen
Emily LaVigne
Shannon McNear
Matt Mikalatos
Rebecca LuElla Miller
Mirtika
Joan Nienhuis
Nissa
John W. Otte
Gavin Patchett
Sarah Sawyer
Andrea Schultz
Tammy Shelnut
Kathleen Smith
Donna Swanson
Jessica Thomas
Steve Trower
Fred Warren
Dona Watson
Phyllis Wheeler
Nicole White
Dave Wilson

In conjunction with the CSFF Blog Tour, I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

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So the tour is back on schedule, and this month’s book is “The God Hater” by Bill Myers.  The book is a sci-fi work, and I wasn’t very excited before reading it.  The title put me off, and I’m not a very big fan of sci-fi.  However, I’ve found from doing the tour that I might miss out on some extremely good books based on such criteria.

And Bill Myer’s book, while not as big of a pleasant surprise as books like “The Charlatin’s Boy”, was a good read and I enjoyed it much more than I thought I would.  The sci-fi element was not as intense as I had assumed it would be, but it definitely increases the further along you read.

The title of the book is based on one of the work’s main characters, a professor who enjoys breaking down the religious beliefs of his students and anyone else who shares with others how they believe.  And through the parallels we see later on in the book, I think we find that the title shows us a problem common to all of mankind to some extend.  It shows that one can claim to follow God, yet meet him face to face and not only not recognize Him… but end up persecuting Him.

I enjoyed all the different elements of the story, and though some particulars in the book do not match up with the Bible, if I remember right most or all of those were limited to being in the fictional world that the book’s fictional characters themselves create.  Add to this that the author inserts a note at the beginning of the book that addresses the issue, and I think readers will be able to understand that these incorrect elements are not meant to be taken as applicable to reality.  I wish more authors would start their books with notes like this, and I’m definitely planning on having such notes in all of my novels.  Overall, I felt like the book made truths of God plain, and easily reached beyond a superficial claim of being a spiritual work of Christian fiction.

I would recommend this book to anyone who does not understand the sacrifice that God has made for his people, as well as for anyone who likes sci-fi or books full of adventure.

Here are some related links:

Book link  –  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1439153264 (or an alternate link of your choice)
Author’s web site – http://www.thegodhater.com/
Author’s Facebook page – http://www.facebook.com/pages/Bill-Myers/44983396181

Check out the fellow blog tour members to see what they think:
Noah Arsenault
Red Bissell
Thomas Clayton Booher
Kathy Brasby
Keanan Brand
Rachel Briard
Beckie Burnham
Morgan L. Busse
Carol Bruce Collett
Valerie Comer
Karri Compton
CSFF Blog Tour
April Erwin
Amber French
Andrea Graham
Tori Greene
Katie Hart
Ryan Heart
Joleen Howell
Bruce Hennigan
Becky Jesse
Cris Jesse
Becca Johnson
Jason Joyner
Carol Keen
Emily LaVigne
Shannon McDermott
Matt Mikalatos
Rebecca LuElla Miller
Mirtika
MollyBuuklvr81
John W. Otte
Sarah Sawyer
Chawna Schroeder
Andrea Schultz
Tammy Shelnut
Kathleen Smith
James Somers
Donna Swanson
Jessica Thomas
Steve Trower
Fred Warren
Dona Watson
Nicole White
Dave Wilson

In conjunction with the CSFF Blog Tour, I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

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Today is the 3rd and final day of the 1st CSFF Blog Tour of 2010.  The book is “The Wolf of Tebron”, book one of CS Lakin’s “Gates of Heaven” series.  Today’s post will wrap up the internet interview with author CS Lakin, and it will include a quick note on the next book in the “Gates of Heaven Series”… “The Map Across Time”.

    *****     Warning, possible spoilers!!     *****

 You mentioned there were 7 sacred sites.  Was one of these sacred sites in The Wolf of Tebron?

Yes, you see the first sacred site—abandoned at the base of the Moon’s house. Ruyah stands in the center and howls. The site, like some of the others you will encounter, produces a star shape when light hits it from the right angle. This star shape is formed inside the circle of stones. But since most are fallen in spots, the star is never fully formed. You will learn about the significance of the star, its symbolism to the Keepers, in book two—The Map across Time. Each book will show a different site—a Gate of Heaven.

Will we see Joran or any of the other characters from this book appearing in future books?

Yes, you see him again in The Map across Time, when the prince from Sherbourne rides into Tebron and needs a new shoe on his horse. Joran’s brother Callen is the hero of The Land of Darkness. My hope is to interweave all the main characters and past plotlines together in the final book(s) to make one last fight against evil, surrounding the seventh of all the sacred sites (gates of heaven). Each book features a different site, and through the series the reader sees how these protective sites have been abandoned or desecrated to where evil has now penetrated the world of humans.

At one point the book speaks of Joran finally waking up, yet I didn’t see anything that changed at that point.  Was there something I missed?

Joran’s wife is trapped in his dream. When he finally enters his dream and saves her, he can then “wake up.” The theme of dreaming is a metaphor. The book shows how we are like a dream in the mind of God, yet he also made us dreamers. We “wake up” when we see how God has given us life and dreams and as Joran realizes in the end, he can now (being awake) be both the dreamer and the dreamed.

….

Again, thank you CS Lakin for your time on this interview and for bringing us the adventure found in “The Wolf of Tebron”. 

If you, my dear reader, would like to ask CS Lakin more about her books visit her website at http://www.cslakin.com/ or her blog at http://cslakin.blogspot.com/.

Book 2 in the “Gates of Heaven” series is called “The Map Across Time”, scheduled for a 2011 release… 

“The kingdom of Sherbourne is plagued by an ancient curse which must be halted before devastation results. The King’s twin teenagers, Adin and Aletha, use a magical map to go back in time to discover the origin of the curse and its cure, but everything goes awry. Can Adin manipulate events in the stream of time to assure the salvation of his kingdom?”

To pick up a copy of “The Wolf of Tebron” visit http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0899578888

Here’s what others from the CSFF Blog Tour had to say:

Noah Arsenault
Amy Bissell
Red Bissell
Justin Boyer
Keanan Brand
Grace Bridges
Beckie Burnham
Jeff Chapman
Christian Fiction Book Reviews
Carol Bruce Collett
Valerie Comer
CSFF Blog Tour
D. G. D. Davidson
April Erwin
Andrea Graham
Nikole Hahn
Katie Hart
Ryan Heart
Bruce Hennigan
Becky Jesse
Cris Jesse
Becca Johnson
Jason Joyner
Julie
Carol Keen
Dawn King
Shannon McDermott
Matt Mikalatos
Rebecca LuElla Miller
Joan Nienhuis
Nissa
John W. Otte
Chawna Schroeder
Tammy Shelnut
Kathleen Smith
James Somers
Rachel Starr Thomson
Robert Treskillard
Fred Warren
Phyllis Wheeler

In conjunction with the CSFF Blog Tour, I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

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So for our 1st book of CSFFBT 2010, “The Wolf of Tebron” by CS Lakin, I had the opportunity to do an internet interview (email Q&A) with the author.  I’ve split the interview into 2 parts, this first part should be spoiler free.  The possible spoilers should be in Wednesday’s post, along with some info on the next book in the “Gates of Heaven” series… “The Map Across Time”.

Why did you pick a wolf for this book?

I wanted to portray God’s loyalty and availability in a way Aslan didn’t represent. I love dogs a lot and feel they teach us so much about God. The wolf is a loyal companion, sticks by Joran’s side through everything he goes through. He is a provider, encourager, and teacher. Yet, the wolf can be fiercely protective, and Ruyah rails against his enemies to save Joran. That’s how I see Jesus—as fighter for us, as he’s the lover of our soul and he will not let the evil one snatch us from his hand.

Does the world this book is set in have a name?

 Fairy Tales do not “name” a different world. It is assumed to be the natural world, or any land in general, but of course, when magic comes into play, the average world is transformed.

Will there be a map put out for the lands in the “Gates of Heaven” series?  

I really dislike maps in fantasy books. They smack of trying to copy The Lord of the Rings by giving their locale some huge importance. If a reader must use a map to understand where his characters are going, then the writer hasn’t done a good enough job in her writing to make the lay of the land clear.

Joran wants to turn down animals when they give him his name, but there’s no Biblical principle to support this attitude.  Why do you think Christians struggle with accepting gifts?

Well, in our world animals don’t do this, so of course there wouldn’t be anything in the Bible to counsel us on that. But Joran’s attitude stems from a respect for their privacy and a feeling that if he’s done a kindness, he needn’t be rewarded. It shows his humility and his good character. It’s not that he doesn’t want a gift; in giving Joran their name, they are relinquishing power to him—so he can summon them at will, as he is unsure he wants that kind of power.

Are we going to learn the story behind the ancient city of Sherbourne?

Sherbourne  is central in The Map across Time, so you will learn much about it and its history in the second installment.

How many books do you think there will be in the “Gates of Heaven” series?

I’ve just completed the fourth tale. I’ve kicked around the idea of possibly ten books in the collection but I supposed we’ll make some decision this year. The Land of Darkness, the third book, should release this fall.

Briefly, what’s the difference between a fantasy story and a faery tale?

There’s a huge distinction between the various subgenres of fantasy and a fairy tale structure. I have some great articles that go into length about this at my website: wwwgatesofheavenseries.com for those who want to examine them. But basically, fairy tales have very specific rules. There is always a task that must be done—usually something nearly impossible, that if gained, will lead to what Chesterton calls “an incomprehensible happiness.” Fairy tales are not just imaginative stories set in other worlds—they are stories that should feel like they begin in our world, an ordinary world, but then transport the character into a world of magic with a very specific end in mind. Think of many of the fairy tales you know—like Jack in the Beanstalk or Cinderella and you will see a pattern like this.

Was one of these sacred sights in The Wolf of Tebron?

…see the answer to this question in tomorrow’s post!

…..

Thank you CS Lakin for your time on this interview, and for a great book.  I’m looking forward to the rest of the “Gates of Heaven” series!

For any readers who have questions for CS Lakin, visit her website at http://www.cslakin.com/  or her blog at http://cslakin.blogspot.com/

To pick up a copy of “The Wolf of Tebron” visit http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0899578888

Be sure to come back tomorrow for more from CS Lakin!

To read what other bloggers had to say, visit the CSFFBT members at:

Noah Arsenault
Amy Bissell
Red Bissell
Justin Boyer
Keanan Brand
Grace Bridges
Beckie Burnham
Jeff Chapman
Christian Fiction Book Reviews
Carol Bruce Collett
Valerie Comer
CSFF Blog Tour
D. G. D. Davidson
April Erwin
Andrea Graham
Nikole Hahn
Katie Hart
Ryan Heart
Bruce Hennigan
Becky Jesse
Cris Jesse
Becca Johnson
Jason Joyner
Julie
Carol Keen
Dawn King
Shannon McDermott
Matt Mikalatos
Rebecca LuElla Miller
Joan Nienhuis
Nissa
John W. Otte
Chawna Schroeder
Tammy Shelnut
Kathleen Smith
James Somers
Rachel Starr Thomson
Robert Treskillard
Fred Warren
Phyllis Wheeler

In conjunction with the CSFF Blog Tour, I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

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This round of reviews for the Christian Sci-Fi Fantasy Blog Tour (CSFFBT) is for C.S. Lakin’s “The Wolf of Tebron.  It’s the first book in the “Gates of Heaven” series.  I was honored to have the chance to review this book back in August, and you can find my original review here.

Since then I’ve read through the book again, done an internet interview with C.S. Lakin, and gathered some more thoughts on the book.  I’ll be doing 3 posts during this tour, Lord willing.  Tonight’s post is on some additional thoughts I had after re-reading the book, examining further the experiences of Joran.  Tuesday’s post will be the 1st portion of the internet interview with the author.   Wednesday’s post will be the last part of the interview with the author which includes possible spoilers, as well as a sneak peek mention of the next book in the “Gates of Heaven” series… “The Map Across Time”.

Now onto the book…

There are a lot of things the main character, Joran, experiences as a direct result of his jealousy.  Those experiences do a good job of describing what we really go through as a result of our jealousy.  Jealous people often close themselves off from possible realities that might truly heal their pain.  Instead they embrace a goal of vengeance that promises a peace, yet it only causes more pain for everybody.  Rage takes over, and the spirit and mind become blind and imprisoned.  It’s a horrible experience, and sadly people don’t considered how their own actions can cause others to suffer through this.  I myself have had major struggles with jealousy, and they completely sapped the life out of me for many years.  I couldn’t believe how well “The Wolf of Tebron” brought those experiences to life in Joran.  I felt every single bit of his pain!

At one point in the book Joran is so self-absorbed that he’s angry about his companion Ruyah having fun on their journey, and he considers it to be at the expense of his own self.  He thinks others are taking joy in the very things that he feels are ruining his life, and that they are somehow making it worse for him.  And in that, he is not only ignorant of the hearts and goals of others, but Joran is unable to see the joy set before him.  It’s the nature of a focus on self.  We were made for God, all things were made for God.  We’re supposed to suffer when we lose sight of God, it helps bring us back to Him.  It is able to wake us up from the nightmares we make of our lives, and direct us back to the reality which is the very base of our earthly experiences.

This book is good for those struggling with jealousy and rage ruling their lives.  It can help the reader take a step back and watch somebody going through the extremes of what the reader is going through.  The reader will likely wonder how someone was able to so accurately capture all the feelings they’re struggling with because of jealousy.  It will help the reader see not only how it sucks their lives away, but also see that there is indeed a true escape available to them in Christ.

To check out the book for yourself visit   http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0899578888

Also visit the author’s webpage at http://www.cslakin.com/ 

Or her blog at http://cslakin.blogspot.com/

Check out what the others in the tour had to say:

Noah Arsenault
Amy Bissell
Red Bissell
Justin Boyer
Keanan Brand
Grace Bridges
Beckie Burnham
Jeff Chapman
Christian Fiction Book Reviews
Carol Bruce Collett
Valerie Comer
CSFF Blog Tour
D. G. D. Davidson
April Erwin
Andrea Graham
Nikole Hahn
Katie Hart
Ryan Heart
Bruce Hennigan
Becky Jesse
Cris Jesse
Becca Johnson
Jason Joyner
Julie
Carol Keen
Dawn King
Shannon McDermott
Matt Mikalatos
Rebecca LuElla Miller
Joan Nienhuis
Nissa
John W. Otte
Chawna Schroeder
Tammy Shelnut
Kathleen Smith
James Somers
Rachel Starr Thomson
Robert Treskillard
Fred Warren
Phyllis Wheeler

In conjunction with the CSFF Blog Tour, I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

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So it’s the end of 2010 already, and it’s time for the December blog tour!  This month we’re reviewing Jonathan Rogers’ “The Charlatan’s Boy”. 

When this book was announced for the tour I remember I was immediately skeptical.  We’ve had a few books on the tour that I really did not care for, and something about this book was bugging me.  I didn’t really know anything about it, other than the title and a little blurb.  I didn’t want to request another copy of a book I was going to give a bad review on, so I considered skipping this one.  However, after realizing I had no real reason to be so against this book I thought I’d go for it.

I almost missed one of the best books I’ve read on this tour!

From the very beginning, Jonathan puts you firmly in the mind of Grady, the star of this show.  It’s obvious Jonathan is a master of language.  At no point in this book do you have to consciously try to see these characters as they speak, they naturally appear vividly in your mind.  Add to that the fact that you can’t even pick up the book and look at the cover without the immersion beginning, and you understand this book will hook you.

The world he has created for the story is great!  If you’re new to this blog, I’m a sucker for well crafted worlds.  I remember a while back someone asking (basically) “what would a fantasy world inspired by the land and heritage of America look like?”.  A real good question, I though… one I had no immediate answer for.  But I think this book is a good answer to that, especially with the culture and lands of southeast USA.  It’s not high fantasy, however it’s not hard to consider this work as being  in the genre of fantasy.

The plot, characters and the world around them flow together naturally.  It appears Jonathan Rogers created an extremely well done work with minimal effort.  I wonder if it was as easy for him to write it as he has made it seem.

I didn’t find a lot of spirituality in this book.  It seems like that’s happening more and more in the books we tour for the CSFFBT.  I hope it’s not a trend authors are seeking to follow.  Again we have a book with potential for spiritual elements, and I hope the next book in the series takes advantage of the groundwork already set in place.  With that said, it does support a Christian world view in a limited extent, and in no way (that I can remember) conflicts with a Christian world view.

I though about writing this review from a Feechie’s perspective… but I didn’t want to take away from Jonathan Rogers’ way with words.  So I guess you’ll have to read the book to see what I’m talking about.

I recommend this book to all readers of fiction, and especially to my fellow countrymen.  I think Andrew Peterson’s growing fan base will love this work as well.  Thank you Jonathan Rogers for the thoroughly enjoyable book, and Lord willing I hope to read the next book as soon as it comes out in fall 2011!

Pick up a copy of your own at http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0307458229

Also, you can visit Jonathan Rogers’ website at  http://jonathan-rogers.com/

Sally Apokedak
Amy Bissell
Red Bissell
Jennifer Bogart
Thomas Clayton Booher
Keanan Brand
Beckie Burnham
Jeff Chapman
Christian Fiction Book Reviews
Valerie Comer
CSFF Blog Tour
D. G. D. Davidson
April Erwin
Andrea Graham
Tori Greene
Katie Hart
Bruce Hennigan
Christopher Hopper
Becky Jesse
Cris Jesse
Jason Joyner
Julie
Carol Keen
Shannon McDermott
Allen McGraw
Matt Mikalatos
Rebecca LuElla Miller
Nissa
Donita K. Paul
SarahFlan
Sarah Sawyer
Chawna Schroeder
Tammy Shelnut
Kathleen Smith
James Somers
Donna Swanson
Robert Treskillard
Fred Warren
Phyllis Wheeler
Nicole White
Elizabeth Williams
Dave Wilson

In conjunction with the CSFF Blog Tour, I received a free copy of this book from the publisher. 

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I want to start by saying how much I appreciate being a part of the Christian Sci-Fi Fantasy Blog Tour (CSFFBT).  I wish I had more time to interact with the other tour members, and always find I enjoy seeing other reviews.  Thank you to Rebecca LuElla Miller and everyone else who makes this tour not only available, but such a successful endeavor.  For those out there who are considering joining, I want to let you know that most of the books are great and the community is very good to their fellows… but these things are self-evident.  Read the other blogs on the tour and you’ll see exactly what I mean!

The October book was “The Skin Map”, by Stephen R. Lawhead.  It’s the first book in the “Bright Empires” series of novels.  Unfortunately the books came late, so the tour was pushed back to this week.  The next month or 2 will likely have altered schedules as well, so keep your eyes open for new reviews.

My first impression… I’m not going to be interested in a book called “The Skin Map”.  I’m not into dark, gruesome things.  Thankfully my worries were for nothing.  Stephen R Lawhead brings another successful tale to the table.

Let us get the bad things out of the way.  First, there were some words that a Christian should never use.  Unfortunately there are a number of people in the limelight bearing the name of Christ and insisting that foul language is not only acceptable, but necessary.  That is what I would call a real example of bearing the Lord’s name in vain… falsely saying God would have things a certain way.  Some may say those words in this book are not considered vulgar or curse words in England, which I don’t really buy.  Even still, common and culturally accepted does not mean good and right.  Not to mention that if the book is to be sold over seas then these may be reasons to consider making an edition without these words for foreign audiences.  Mr. Lawhead, I’d like to ask you to consider this (again if you’ve already done so) for your future books.  Thanks!

Second, some of the words completely took me out of the book.  This may be due to Mr. Lawhead being from England, it may be from my need for a larger vocabulary.  However, I got the impression he was trying to be as specific as possible with the least amount of words in a few spots, and in said examples it was a nocent modus operandi, inducing a surcease of raptness.  However, I could probably count on one hand (possibly 2 hands) the amount of times this happened… and not that’s not because I’m unable to count  ;p

Third, I felt the end of the book, while good, was not a real ending at all… therefore requiring the reader to read future installments to get the feeling that they really finished the book.  Now I will say that in some books this really bothers me.  I know it bothered my wife some with this book.  However, it didn’t really bug me that much with “The Skin Map”, though I haven’t yet figured out why.

The only other thing I thought could have been better was a presentation of God and His Truth.  While the story wasn’t necessarily anti-scriptural in its fictional setting (certainly it would support input from a Biblical world view), the book wasn’t deep in spiritual truths either.  It felt like a lot of the spiritual aspects were simply “nods” to Christianity.  There were opportunities to weave spiritual truth and inspirational realities that Lawhead didn’t seem interested in pursuing, though I can certainly see how these things may grow greatly later in the series.  I’m hoping to see Lawhead capitalize on these opportunities as Bright Empires progresses.

So those were the downers, not enough there for me to turn someone away from the book though.

Now the good things!

Again the presentation of the book was top notch.  The slip cover, hardcover, paper quality, rough cutting of the pages to match the story… it was physically put together well.  I imagine it will survive many readings.

The story was great.  I don’t remember any plot holes, it engaged me more and more as the pages flew by, it was well-balanced with character development, and though it was deep it wasn’t too complicated to follow.  I remember in Stephen Lawhead’s book “Tuck” I felt that he drove the story rather than letting the story drive him, like he made something happen whether it fit the story or not.  However in “The Skin Map” I don’t remember getting that feeling at all.  The few “convenient” events that caused me to consider this problem only really ended up making me even more drawn into the story, excited to see how they would naturally fit into the story further on. 

Using the story to open up people’s thinking was great, and though I don’t think there are ley lines leading to alternate realities and times I do think we need to remember that we don’t have the world around us as figured out as we think… not even close.  The essay at the end contributed to this nicely, and I was glad Stephen included it.

And on that note, the world he created is indeed a fascinating one.  Though not overly original (I know, I know, there’s NOTHING new underneath the sun), I do think he’s going to bring the commonly used things together in a very uncommon way.  He did it in “Tuck”, and it appears he wants to do so even more in the Burning Empires.  Even the name of the series suggests so (and it really makes me excited to read the rest of the series!).

The characters were a blast to follow!  They seemed to develop very naturally, and I’m looking forward to seeing what they do with the rest of the story line!  I’ve got some theories about what’s going to happen to who, but I won’t say anything more save that if Lawhead decides to do something that squashes my theories I have a feeling it will probably make me even more excited about the books.

So overall this book is one I will be recommending to you.  Fans of speculative fiction, and Christians wanting to read something that doesn’t throw a ton of garbage in your face, will find many reasons to appreciate this novel.  I find I’m compelled to make sure the entire Burning Empires series finds a home on my book shelf. 

I want to thank you again Stephen R. Lawhead for another very enjoyable book, and for giving me some books to look forward to reading, Lord willing.  I hope and pray that God leads you in the rest of the series!

If you’d like a copy of The Skin Map visit http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1595548041

For more on the series check out http://TheBrightEmpires.com

To see Stephen R. Lawhead’s website visithttp://www.stephenlawhead.com/

For other reviews and related information, visit some (or all) of the following sites from other CSFFBT members:

Red Bissell
Thomas Clayton Booher
Keanan Brand
Grace Bridges
Beckie Burnham
Morgan L. Busse
Jeff Chapman
Christian Fiction Book Reviews
Valerie Comer
Karri Compton
Amy Cruson
CSFF Blog Tour
Stacey Dale
D. G. D. Davidson
George Duncan
April Erwin
Tori Greene
Ryan Heart
Bruce Hennigan
Timothy Hicks
Christopher Hopper
Becky Jesse
Cris Jesse
Becca Johnson
Jason Joyner
Julie
Carol Keen
Krystine Kercher
Shannon McDermott
Allen McGraw
Matt Mikalatos
Rebecca LuElla Miller
Nissa
John W. Otte
Gavin Patchett
Sarah Sawyer
Chawna Schroeder
Kathleen Smith
Rachel Starr Thomson
Donna Swanson
Robert Treskillard
Steve Trower
Fred Warren
Dona Watson
Phyllis Wheeler
Nicole White
Elizabeth Williams
Dave Wilson

In conjunction with the CSFF Blog Tour, I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

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